Heavenspot

Our Work

Mobile App
Barbie Life App

Heavenspot worked closely with Mattel to create the ultimate Barbie Life application. Users immerse themselves in Barbie’s world with her friends and family in their picturesque Malibu Dreamhouse.

View Case Study >
Social Media
ABC Television

Heavenspot partnered with ABC Television to make its 2013 lineup a social media sensation.

View Case Study >
Social Media
Pacific Rim

For the Pacific Rim’s home entertainment release, Heavenspot created a social campaign rallying the world to fight united against the Kaiju threat.

View Case Study >
Social Media
Bad Grandpa

Heavenspot partnered with Paramount Pictures to turn Johnny Knoxville's irreverent character into a social media sensation.

View Case Study >
Social Media
Best Man Holiday

Heavenspot crafted a social media campaign engaging and activating fans 14 years after the release of Universal Picture's classic film, The Best Man.

View Case Study >
Website
Coachella Festival

Heavenspot works closely with our client Goldenvoice to make the digital experience of the Coachella Valley Music Festival easy to use and seamless to the end user. Click to check out our case study to learn all about the exciting technology and design that powers this experience.

View Case Study >
Website
Ultimate Ears

Making Music Social Again with Logitech's Ultimate Ears. The inaugural launch of the website included the launch of an exciting new product known as the UE Boom. Heavenspot designed and built a fully responsive site, with mobile in mind first.

View Case Study >
Mobile App
Horror Movie Maker

In our third update to our film making app for Lionsgate, Heavenspot skinned the experience with their latest macabre masterpiece, You're Next - a haunting psychological thriller. Beyond simply adding new effects, we added new functionality in the ability to create realistic still photos.

View Case Study >
Social Media
AMC's The Pitch

Heavenspot participated in AMC's documentary television series, The Pitch. Two ad agencies are pitted against each other in an effort to win a high profile client. Watch as our agency battles it out, both internally and externally in an effort to find the Big Idea. Should be an interesting ride!

View Case Study >
AIR App
The Future of Play

Heavenspot worked closely with Mattel on the strategy and execution of their product launches and technologies that bring their iconic properties to life. In creating a user experience tailored to kids, we explored the concept of simplicity in design and overall ease of use. Sometimes less is better.

View Case Study >
Website
TRON: Legacy

Heavenspot worked with Disney to create a fully immersive 3D experience to transport audiences into the world of TRON. The site features Unity 3D Technology to provide an unparalleled gaming experience.

View Case Study >
Website
Roy's Revenge

Roy's Revenge is an homage to the classic arcade. Heavenspot created a fully responsive HTML5 8-bit game to bring an old school interpretation to Universal Picture's supernatural film R.I.P.D.

View Case Study >

Heavenspot // Blog

HiRes_550x627
Kathryn Perez-Fraga

Vice President, Social Media

Don’t Say Ninja: Tips for Social Media Job Seekers

When I tell people I work in social media, I frequently hear things like “Oh, you should hire my friend so-and-so, he has tons of followers on Instagram.”  I’m sure that the friend is a cool guy and all, but there’s an enormous difference between developing a personal social following and being able to use social media for business.  Based on the personal, fast-moving nature of the field, that difference is quite often misunderstood.

I frequently see this same confusion in individuals applying for jobs in social media, so I thought I would use my experience to offer some advice for those of you about to graduate or working professionals seeking a job in social media.

Social Media is the how, not the what.  Businesses have an end goal, which almost always involves driving revenue.  You always need to understand that goal, in order to create campaigns that support it.  For many of our clients, that means buying tickets for a movie or tuning into a TV show.  That doesn’t mean social media is the right place to hard sell the product, but we need to be aware of that goal to be able to appropriately plan content, cadence and responses.  Social can be part of marketing, publicity, customer service, even product development strategies.  Knowing why the brand or company is using social before going into an interview will allow you ask well-informed questions.  I always appreciate questions from candidates about future plans for a brand’s social strategy (though I may not answer them on site.)  You can also find out quite a bit about the company’s approach to social by the professional background of their senior social media team.  Twitter didn’t exist when many of us were in college – so ask us how we ended up in this field and you may get an indication of which qualities the brand or agency values in its social team.

Strategy does not mean “ideas.” A strategic social media campaign is a multi-faceted plan driving to an end goal, considering (though not necessarily using) all social platforms and associated digital touchpoints with the consumer. This usually involves a coordinated effort between marketing, PR, paid media, and other stakeholders in brand communications.  I frequently see “social media strategy” listed as an expertise of entry level candidates, though after discussion, usually find that they mean that they have a track record of coming up with creative executions for social media.  That’s a big strength – so sell it for what it is!

Understand the machine.  Social media is a party being hosted by technology.  All social platforms and the devices that people use to access them live on a technical infrastructure.  Understanding the fundamentals of that technology is critical to success in social media.  I’m not saying you need to learn how to write code – but you do need to understand things like how the Facebook algorithm works and the specs for video playback on mobile devices.

Speak the language.  Social media is a field overflowing with buzzwords.  Some of them are meaningless.  Some of them are not.  It goes without saying that you should have a working knowledge of traditional marketing terms and be able to speak thoughtfully to each platform’s unique benefits and challenges.  In an interview for a social media position, you should also be prepared to speak to content types, engagement strategies and measuring data.

Be connected.  Social media lives and breathes on real-time communication and a brand’s ability to leverage it.  Showing the hiring manager that you are aware of what’s happening in the world will subtly reinforce their impression of you as someone who can help their team be aware of every new opportunity that social conversation presents.  This also means being on top of your own social channels – make sure they are current (and public.) This gives you a chance to show a potential employer what you bring to the table beyond the constraints of what a traditional interview allows.

Be professional.  Excessive familiarity and casual language seem to be a unique phenomenon among social media job candidates.  Frequently, the candidate is attempting to show personality – but that isn’t the way to do it.  Don’t use silly terms like “diva” or “ninja” on your resume when applying to a major brand or agency.  Don’t show up late and address the hiring manager with a “Hey girl, shit is crazy right now” (true story.)  Personality is important – so is curating perception. Your employer is trusting you to be on the front lines of their communication with the public, so it’s important to show that you will approach your job thoughtfully and appropriately.  Sending a thank you note after the interview is not only the polite thing to do, it also gives you a chance to remind potential employers of the great conversation you had and showcase a bit of that sparkling personality.

A final note on job searches: sometimes, you have to stick it out to find the right fit.  Don’t just jump on the first offer, look for a match in personality, energy and company values.  This is a fast moving business and chances are your job description will look substantially different in a few years.  You want to make sure that you are in a role that will allow you to develop a wide variety of skills that will keep you on top of your game.  Good luck!

Kathryn Perez-Fraga is Vice President, Social Media at Heavenspot, working with brands including Netflix, Twentieth Century Fox and Warner Bros on what’s next in social. Follow her on Twitter @katpf.

zapata_thumb
Chevon Hicks

President / Creative Director

Creating with Adobe Ideas

This image of Zapata, the famous Mexican Revolutionary, was created in Adobe’s touch app, Adobe Ideas. Creatives will find the app itself revolutionary in that we can now create high quality vector artwork on the go. My own illustration work typically starts with a photograph, so I was basically at the mercy of my desktop machine, wacom tablet and available hi-res photography. Achieving a hand drawn look was usually something that occurred after I’d spent countless hours with the pen tool, quickly tracing out shape after shape. Sure, this can be called “drawing”, but it always needed the ironic quotation marks, since the act of creating vector illustrations was nothing like drawing in the traditional sense. Even the idea of drawing with other tools, say the Blob brush, still felt removed as my hand only lived in my peripheral vision as I stared at the screen.

pacman_thumb
Julia Bartine

VP, Strategy

Are Video Games Art?

MoMA recently acquired 12 video games for a new branch of the museum’s permanent collection. The addition of video games to an art museum conjures the ongoing discourse on… what is art? Just yesterday, an editor I respect defined art for his publication as ‘something with no function, that evokes emotion’. In most contexts that makes sense… but there are grey areas… fashion, video games, documentary film, architecture, to name a few. Liel Leibovitz at New Republic said, “put bluntly, ”no.” Video games aren’t art because they are, quite thoroughly, something else: code.” He cites the case of Pac-Man v. Puckman, a knock off game by a company named Artic in from 1982 that cited the Title 17 of the US code of copyright protection that applied to “original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression.”

  • Heavenspot // Blog

    Don’t Say Ninja: Tips for Social Media Job Seekers

    When I tell people I work in social media, I frequently hear things like “Oh, you should hire my friend so-and-so, he has tons of followers on Instagram.”  I’m sure that the friend is a cool guy and all, but there’s an enormous difference between developing a personal social following and being able to use social media for business.  Based on the personal, fast-moving nature of the field, that difference is quite often misunderstood.

    I frequently see this same confusion in individuals applying for jobs in social media, so I thought I would use my experience to offer some advice for those of you about to graduate or working professionals seeking a job in social media.

    Social Media is the how, not the what.  Businesses have an end goal, which almost always involves … READ MORE >

  • Heavenspot // Blog

    Creating with Adobe Ideas

    This image of Zapata, the famous Mexican Revolutionary, was created in Adobe’s touch app, Adobe Ideas. Creatives will find the app itself revolutionary in that we can now create high quality vector artwork on the go. My own illustration work typically starts with a photograph, so I was basically at the mercy of my desktop machine, wacom tablet and available hi-res photography. Achieving a hand drawn look was usually something that occurred after I’d spent countless hours with the pen tool, quickly tracing out shape after shape. Sure, this can be called “drawing”, but it always needed the ironic quotation marks, since the act of creating vector illustrations was nothing like drawing in the traditional sense. Even the idea of drawing with other tools, say the Blob brush, still felt removed as my hand only lived in my peripheral vision as I stared at the screen.

  • Heavenspot // Blog

    Are Video Games Art?

    MoMA recently acquired 12 video games for a new branch of the museum’s permanent collection. The addition of video games to an art museum conjures the ongoing discourse on… what is art? Just yesterday, an editor I respect defined art for his publication as ‘something with no function, that evokes emotion’. In most contexts that makes sense… but there are grey areas… fashion, video games, documentary film, architecture, to name a few. Liel Leibovitz at New Republic said, “put bluntly, ”no.” Video games aren’t art because they are, quite thoroughly, something else: code.” He cites the case of Pac-Man v. Puckman, a knock off game by a company named Artic in from 1982 that cited the Title 17 of the US code of copyright protection that applied to “original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression.”

Twitter@HVNSPT
Facebookfacebook.com/HVNSPT
Instagram@HVNSPT